Advanced Studio, Fall 2008: Woofter & Crompton

  • Work by Kun Cao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Kun Cao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
  • Work by Kun Cao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Kun Cao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
  • Work by Nick Kunkle for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Nick Kunkle for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
  • Work by Nick Kunkle for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Nick Kunkle for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
  • Work by Kentaro & Hao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Kentaro & Hao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
  • Work by Kentaro & Hao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.
    Work by Kentaro & Hao for advanced studio taught by Heather Woofter & Dennis Crompton, Fall 2008.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2008
PROTOTYPE COMMUNITY

Dennis Crompton, Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor
Heather Woofter, Assistant Professor

Urban areas have generally evolved through the natural expansion of small settlements, from hamlet to village to town to city to metropolis. In the course of this development, the form and patterns have constantly adapted to the changing demands of the citizens. Alongside these organic urban forms have been developments based on a conceptual model – ie. the Roman and American city grids, or the new urban forms from Ebenezer Howard to Le Corbusier.

In the 1960s, groups such as Archigram suggested alternative concepts based on indeterminacy, response, and interaction. These concepts were becoming practical through emerging technologies and appropriate through social change.

This studio examines, in detail, these preoccupations in the present and the future. The subject is a Prototype Community, initially of 6,000 to 8,000 inhabitants. Working individually or in groups, students focus on the needs of the population, from the individual in his/her domestic environment going about daily life, to the community as a cohesive social whole, where individuals depend on each for the sustainability of their society.

Key words for this project might include: infrastructure, amenity, space and its dimensions, permanence, change, separation, integration, layering, communities, neighborhoods, demographics, participation, regeneration, sustainability, efficiency, form, experiment and getting it wrong, intimate scale, large scale, public space, private space, access, movement, transport, communications, events, interaction, response, commerce, education, health, welfare, employment, recreation, entertainment.