Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Collins & Hasegawa

  • Work by Xi Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Xi Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Xi Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Xi Chen for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Ji Hao for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.
    Work by Ji Hao for advanced studio taught by Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
Participating Bodies, Self-Innovating Codes

Mark Collins, Visiting Professor
Toru Hasegawa, Visiting Professor

Computational design is a "hot media"—it can easily overwhelm the visual sense with a torrent of detail and complexity, even when generated through relatively simple rules. Loops, recursions, and agents are powerful tools to deploy architectural intent, but their strange logic can obscure the fundamental role of technology (including architecture) to extend the body and its various faculties.

This studio examines how the concept and physicality of bodies can be integrated into architectural genesis and transformation. Building codes offer a convenient shorthand for the body’s engagement with building through such concepts as life-safety, egress, and assembly. As a starting point, students use parametric modeling to study various building codes and regulations that distill a particular knowledge of the "architectural body." Using Processing, an advanced scripting platform, they then move beyond these simple feed-forward systems into dynamic, performative models that can evolve and self-innovate, much like the bodies they emulate and respond to.

Based around the mechanics of bodies, object-oriented programming allows us to integrate research on both tectonic and phenomenal characteristics while simultaneously exploring multiple solutions to problems.

The site and context of this exploration is a school set within a green space in St. Louis, an integrated learning environment where several forms of education and age groups are present. The program and physical infrastructure reinforce the modalities of teaching and learning that rely on spatial support while vitalizing the space with an array of digital technologies that support distance learning and cross-cultural exchanges.