Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Healy

  • Work by Brad Lightner for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Brad Lightner for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Ryan Spataro for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Ryan Spataro for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jake Brotter for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jake Brotter for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jake Brotter for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jake Brotter for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Hilary Miners for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Hilary Miners for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Dan Zhang for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.
    Work by Dan Zhang for advanced studio taught by Brian Healy, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
Small Urban Zoos

Brian Healy, Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

In a story, the narrative is captured in the telling; it is the selective details and descriptive moments that evoke a tone or mood. The plot is what actually happens, and a good plot can produce countless stories. I am interested in an architecture that suggests an equivalent multiplicity of tellings, and in plots that suggest narratives that are complex and layered.

Architecture is made not of intentions but of works. This studio focuses on the translation of ideas into legible architectural form that engages both plot and narration.

Students begin by analyzing several existing buildings by Alvaro Siza with an emphasis on their materiality; ideas of enclosure, of approach and departure; detailing; and the relationships between interior and exterior landscapes.

They then turn their attention to the neighborhood around Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The goal is to design, develop, and detail a collection of small zoos on an urban in-fill site in this historic, eccentric neighborhood. Each zoo focuses on a particular class from the animal kingdom.

The criteria for the evaluation of these buildings is the relationship of the building to the site; the quality of experience of both external and interior spaces; the accommodation of the creatures; and the articulation of building components.

The studio also addresses the impact of circumstance upon detailing. Rather than viewing the act of detailing as the elaboration of a preconceived schematic design, students examine how a particular circumstance or condition can suggest a detail and influence the design prior to schematic design.