Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Hoffman

  • Work by Christopher Chappell for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Christopher Chappell for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Brendan Wittstruck for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Brendan Wittstruck for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Andrew Davis for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Andrew Davis for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jack Palmer for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jack Palmer for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Andrew Davis for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Andrew Davis for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Jack Palmer for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.
    Work by Jack Palmer for advanced studio taught by Eric Hoffman, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
ClientCityPathPlace

Eric Hoffman, Visiting Assistant Professor

Rarely do we—as professionals—connect with a single individual. It is commonplace to balance many needs of many constituents, often with opposing or contradictory views. This challenge holds many opportunities. A collective vision is key to political success, and a strategy for every mark within a (sub)urban fabric is paramount.

The City of Maplewood is host for this comprehensive studio. Once viewed as a point that was "on the way" to another destination, Maplewood is struggling to redefine its corridor(s) from "path" to "place." Currently it can be described as a transitioning city thriving between the poles of large-scale development and small-scale storefront.

The growing phenomenon of failed large-scale development is leaving a permanent scar on our cities; the gamble of potential economic favor must be weighed against failed impact. This studio provides a contrasting view to large-scale development while moving past simple ideas of mixed-use as solution.

Focusing principally on issues of connectivity and sustainability as a model for long-term growth, the studio is divided into two distinct studies. Students begin with a thorough analysis of historical and existing context, followed by a series of sub-topic studies and surgical interventions. At mid-semester, they present a master study and associated design principles for Maplewood’s Manchester Corridor and its tributaries.

For the second half of the semester, students select a building type and site from the master study for development. As with any sited work, the notion of "place" must be considered, and any intervention must serve as an extension of context and local culture. Program and building types could include: special education facility, boutique hotel, Maplewood theater, destination retail outlet, amplified music venue, health and wellness spa, market, and medium-density housing, among others.