Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Holden

  • Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Yuying Chen for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Yuying Chen for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Yuying Chen for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Yuying Chen for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Zephyr Anthony for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.
    Work by Zephyr Anthony for advanced studio taught by Philip Holden, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
Revealing Place: Erasing the Scaffold

Philip Holden, Senior Lecturer

Our a priori conceptions of space have broad implications regarding our ability to develop an architecture of heterogeneity and social richness. This studio investigates directly the mechanics of spatial production and speculates on methods to create an architecture that is projective, allowing the emergence of new social arrangements and institutional forms.

Students begin by developing intrinsic conceptions of the space of the project, exploring two realms of understanding and of generating spatial relationships. The first is a set of abstract mathematical constructs of space, models that can be generated and manipulated without necessarily having any basis in a perception of the real world. The second is generated through experience, its mathematics developed only in response to observations.

These complex spatial scaffolds can then be used to support an architecture. As students cross the threshold into place-making and construction, they eventually erase the explicit scaffold directing the project, the insistence of its order diminishing but remaining implicit in the work. Finally, they develop all aspects of the architecture—formal, experiential, organizational, environmental, structural, material, and technical.

The majority of the semester is focused on an extensive site condition between Clayton Road and Highway 64/40. Programmatic possibilities include a hotel, manufacturing, and housing for the elderly. While students work in the same precinct, not everyone is working with the same site and program. With the intention of further advancing new social relationships, there are opportunities and negotiations between sub-sites, adjacent projects, and competing spatial constructs.

The primary project is informed by a smaller two-week project near Washington State Park, creating both a protection and public engagement of the largest collection of Native American petroglyphs in Missouri.