Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Lima

  • Work by Shin Young Park for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Shin Young Park for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Cameron Bence for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Cameron Bence for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Roberto Jaime Deseda for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Roberto Jaime Deseda for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Shin Young Park for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Shin Young Park for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Roberto Jaime Deseda for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Roberto Jaime Deseda for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Cameron Bence for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.
    Work by Cameron Bence for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
Interstitial Landscapes: The Architecture of Urban Public Spaces, São Paulo, Brazil

Zeuler Lima, Associate Professor

Visiting São Paulo for the first time in the 1980s, architect Aldo van Eyck described the Museum of Art (1957-1969) as a "building that has given back to the city as much as it had taken from it." He was referring to the generous public space Lina Bo Bardi created between the museum and the city as she lifted the building from the ground.

The museum was not alone in its approach to public space. The need to deal with small and juxtaposed urban lots, irregular streets, and crowded spaces prompted São Paulo designers to creatively open interstitial spaces in dense urban blocks, leaving meaningful marks in the city’s architectural, urban, and social landscape. Those structures and their interstitial landscapes were particularly popular from the 1950s-1980s, but as the city kept growing, they tended to accommodate new kinds of activities or fall into disrepair. More recently, however, they have gained new meaning and interest as part of the process of revitalizing core urban areas.

The main goal of this comprehensive studio is to revisit interstitial landscape typologies in São Paulo as a means for investigating the relationship architecture maintains with urban and landscape design. Following initial investigations of definitions of public space and design precedents, students develop collective research and self-initiated individual design hypotheses. Proposals start with the definition of programs for enclosed and open private and public spaces, aiming to integrate the selected site—a mid-size lot in the historic center of São Paulo—as an extension to the urban fabric of the Anhangabaú Valley and to the pedestrian spaces that exist in the downtown area.

In line with van Eyck's thinking, design projects should ultimately offer to the city more than they take away from it.