Advanced Studio, Spring 2011: Kolatan

  • Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Kola Johnson for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Kola Johnson for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Joseph Kuhn for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Joseph Kuhn for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Carlos Planchart for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Carlos Planchart for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Kola Johnson for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Kola Johnson for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Carlos Planchart for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.
    Work by Carlos Planchart for advanced studio taught by Ferda Kolatan, Spring 2011.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2011
IN_FORMATION: Institute of Geology on Wards Island in New York City

Ferda Kolatan, Visiting Professor

Geology deals in the most fundamental way with the formation of matter over time. It provides an understanding of how all inanimate shapes emerge, grow, transform, and ultimately break down and dissolve. Geological structures are an expression of the dynamic forces that mold them and cannot be sufficiently understood without the context of environment, climate, and most critically time.

Aside from the investigative methodologies that aim to unearth deep principles of what constitutes our world, Geology is also concerned with practical and applicable solutions that better or protect the world we live in. Structural geology, stratigraphy, and engineering geology are just a few branches that deal with questions regarding natural hazards and environmental issues.

For this studio, students propose designs for an Institute of Geology located at the southern tip of Wards Island in New York City. The building must serve as both a research facility and an exhibition space to engage visitors in geological subjects. Students experiment with morphodynamic modeling tools (in Maya), which emulate time-based formation principles and seek to generate integrated yet authentic design solutions for the program and site. Formal, structural, and organizational patterns emerging from this experimentation are tested against architectural constraints and for their ability to engage the specific properties of the site in an organic and non-intrusive fashion. The applied design methodologies are nonlinear and multihierarchical, allowing for variability and adaptation while maintaining a high degree of resolution and finesse. The building site and adjacent landscape/river's edge are treated as a single contiguous field of operation.