Advanced Studio, Spring 2011: Metter

  • Work by Whitney Knuf for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Whitney Knuf for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Whitney Knuf for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Whitney Knuf for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Zhexiong Chai for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Zhexiong Chai for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Zhexiong Chai for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Zhexiong Chai for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.
    Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by Andrew Metter, Spring 2011.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2011
Hunger: Food Pantry/Urban Farm Prototype

Andrew Metter, Visiting Professor

Most existing large-scale urban food depositories/pantries are based on a model of food production and distribution that has not changed in the last 40 years. It is essentially the same model used by large private grocery chains, involving off-site food acquisition (either through production or donation) and dissemination to large distribution centers. In some cases, these distribution centers are then accessed by individuals or organizations that truck the goods to smaller, local urban distribution points. In other cases, patrons are required to visit the large facility, typically located in a less accessible, suburban location. Moving forward, this model will be unsustainable—it requires rethinking and redesign, from food production techniques and location to more innovative, mobile, and finer-grained distribution strategies.

For this comprehensive studio, students examine these issues by designing a prototype food pantry/urban farm that provides a more sustainable method for the production and distribution of food for the hungry in the City of Chicago. The program consists of a food pantry, community room, food storage, administrative offices, nutrition class areas, community kitchen, volunteer lockers, emergency SRO rooms, and an urban farm plot.

The studio consists of two groups, each addressing a different prototype site with consideration of the following factors:
– Food production, including an examination of technical constraints on urban farming proposals.
– Food distribution, with an eye toward developing a "kit of parts" solution that can be adapted to varying urban conditions.
– Scalability, with program elements adjusting to varying site conditions.