Advanced Studio, Spring 2011: Payá & Moyano

  • Work by Ailen Garcia for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Ailen Garcia for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Ailen Garcia for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Ailen Garcia for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Sangyoon Kim for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Sangyoon Kim for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Sunil Kumar for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Sangyoon Kim for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.
    Work by Sangyoon Kim for advanced studio taught by Alfredo Payá Benedito & Pablo Moyano, Spring 2011.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2011
The St. Louis Effect: Inserting Projects into New Situations

Alfredo Payá Benedito, Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor
Pablo Moyano, Lecturer

Everybody knows of a site that causes them to ask themselves: What could be done here? How could I improve this site? How could this site be used?

For this studio, students each select a site in St. Louis whose needs—defined as "new situations"—they are familiar with, and which merit an intervention. This site could be located anywhere—a location on the student’s route from home, a familiar place where the student walks with his dog, a problematic intersection, a piece of unfinished city. Selection should be based on the objective needs of the intervention: integration problem areas, special or iconic places of the city, areas lacking basic public facilities, contexts that have raised some controversy in the city, places with strong social demands, etc. Most importantly, the site must be a place where the individual is interested in solving some problem.

Proposals are derived from the needs of the new situation, allowing students to explore the relationship between a determined site and social context with the architecture. After analyzing the site and its needs, students develop programs, identify activities, and think about public space interventions.

All cities have situations that are repeated: access roads with wasted spaces, run-down outskirts of town, parking requirements, areas that need to be improved. The overall objective of this studio is for students to identify and develop "new situations" that could be repeated as a kind of "franchise" proposal, extrapolating the solution to other parts of the city. Ultimately, individual projects are used to generate a collective map of "franchiseable" new situation projects that would benefit the City of St. Louis and its inhabitants.