Studio Work: Seoul, Fall 2010

  • Work by Daniel Katebini Stengel, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Daniel Katebini Stengel, Fall 2010, Seoul.
  • Work by Sangyoon Kim, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Sangyoon Kim, Fall 2010, Seoul.
  • Work by Elisa Kim, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Elisa Kim, Fall 2010, Seoul.
  • Work by Daniel Katebini Stengel, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Daniel Katebini Stengel, Fall 2010, Seoul.
  • Work by Brendan Willis, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Brendan Willis, Fall 2010, Seoul.
  • Work by Brendan Willis, Fall 2010, Seoul.
    Work by Brendan Willis, Fall 2010, Seoul.

Seoul International Studio, Fall 2010

Marc Brossa, Lecturer Abroad
Junsung Kim, Lecturer Abroad

For the past 40-plus years, urban development in Korea has been driven primarily by the housing market. The model for city growth, urban renovation, and the production of new cities is based on the provision of mega-blocks served by infrastructure that private agents develop for maximum profit. These structures render themselves economically irrelevant every 20 years, after which they are bulldozed and redeveloped from scratch. The housing product is highly standardized and optimized into the ubiquitous "apartment complexes" that are home to more than 50 percent of the Korean population.

This urban model is now in crisis. It is becoming obvious that construction companies are not catering to a real housing demand but trying to keep their profits. Issues of maintenance of the aging housing market, lack of urban services, growing ecological awareness, and social inequality are becoming increasingly important.

For this studio, students develop housing strategies capable of articulating new urban models that are more socially, economically, and environmentally responsible. Specifically, they must create strategies that address how the 7th district of the city of Anyang—a redevelopment zone slated for total demolition—could develop in the
future.

The studio approaches collective housing from different scales: housing as city-making (urbanism), housing as an aggregational system (morphology), and housing as an inhabitable unit (typology). Special attention is given to the system of open spaces that can extend the private habitability toward the urban public space, conforming a gradient of privacy capable of creating the link between these scales.

As part of this studio, students participate in the 3rd Anyang Public Art Program's Open University, a community-based public project that inquires into the conditions of Korean cities.