Advanced Studio, Spring 2012: Hoeferlin

  • Work by Lauren Harrison for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by Lauren Harrison for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Lauren Harrison for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by Lauren Harrison for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Christopher Perrodin for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by Christopher Perrodin for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Lynette Salas for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by Lynette Salas for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
  • Work by John Song for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by John Song for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
  • Work by John Song for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.
    Work by John Song for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2012.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2012
Gutter to Gulf

Derek Hoeferlin, Assistant Professor

Now in its fourth year, Gutter to Gulf is a five-year, multidisciplinary effort between Washington University and the University of Toronto that aims to develop resilient, comprehensive, synthetic water management strategies for New Orleans and its environs. In order to provide clear and accessible information to diverse audiences, the initiative is designed to extend and support efforts by grassroots organizations. It has been organized to address water management questions across the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. It is intended to ground multi-scaled design proposals in a clear understanding of the challenges facing southern Louisiana.

While Gutter to Gulf's first three phases studied the urbanized area of New Orleans, this fourth phase has moved downriver to St. Bernard Parish and its drainage unit (polder). The St. Bernard polder is the strategic first line of defense protecting New Orleans from the Gulf of Mexico's potential storm surges and effects of sea-level rise. The polder is an extreme landscape that includes urbanized and suburbanized areas; massive flood protection infrastructures and industrial refineries; fishing camps; and deteriorating wetlands.

The specific area of study for this studio engages four sites along the Violet Canal, the Central Wetlands Unit, the "Great Wall of Louisiana," and the decommissioned Mississippi River Gulf Outlet's closure structure. Students are asked to take design positions on how and why architecture can occupy such an extreme deltaic landscape radically experiencing current and future transformations. Students develop their own architecture programs and strategies that adapt to such conditions. Final proposals include cypress nurseries, hunting camps, public markets, water parks, and wellness retreats.