Advanced Studio, Spring 2012: Dykers/MacKeith

  • Work by Anita Hsieh for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Anita Hsieh for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Zhuoli Yang for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Zhuoli Yang for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Zhuoli Yang for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Zhuoli Yang for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Yu Chen for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Yu Chen for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Jonathan McKee for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Jonathan McKee for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Jonathan McKee for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.
    Work by Jonathan McKee for advanced studio taught by Craig Dykers & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2012.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2012
Caring Places and the Power of the Every Day

Craig Dykers, Ruth and Norman Visiting Professor
Peter MacKeith, Associate Professor

Architectural development and the forces that drive it tend to promote ever-increasing levels of protection. In many ways buildings have become increasingly representative of a form of control, especially control over the natural conditions that frame our daily lives. To promote a sense of control over the uncontrollable, many architectural works disassociate the solution from the natural and the physical conditions affecting it. Roofs are made flat because the architecture should be more powerful than the raindrops that fall on it; windows recede into slots as the recognition of spending time to view something is lost. Is there a way to work with this challenge, to connect directly to the physical?

This comprehensive studio focuses on creating places of connection and relevance by focusing on human conditions for living. In particular, students evaluate new environments for people with cancer care. It is not a cancer treatment center; instead, it is a post-cancer facility for those who have completed or are completing cancer treatment at another facility. The project is located in St. Louis and small in size—no larger than about 4,000 square feet. The small scale allows students to more carefully examine the project at many levels.

Cancer is not a scientific problem. The high potential for discomfort and death that cancer creates forces a re-evaluation of what architecture can do for the living. This is an important component of the disease, especially amid the current state of elevated disassociation and pacing in our lives. Cancer care includes physical as well as psychological challenges not dissimilar to those most people face every day, except at a heightened level; it is a valuable program for understanding immediacy in architecture and reconsidering architectural goals.