Advanced Studio, Spring 2012: Lima

  • Work by Ashley Morgan for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by Ashley Morgan for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Ashley Morgan for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by Ashley Morgan for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
  • Work by David Orndorff for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by David Orndorff for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
  • Work by David Orndorff for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by David Orndorff for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Reid Caudill for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by Reid Caudill for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Alec Perkins for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.
    Work by Alec Perkins for advanced studio taught by Zeuler Lima, Spring 2012.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2012
Interstitial Landscapes

Zeuler Lima, Associate Professor

This comprehensive studio embraces the unique history of Florence, Italy, not as a static legacy from the past, but as a dynamic contemporary phenomenon. Students are invited to respond to one of the world's most renowned public spaces—the Piazza degli Uffizi—through the creation of a City Museum connecting the plaza and the right bank of the Arno River.

The museum should not be conceived of as the traditional depository of a collection, but rather as a dynamic center for the study of the coexistence between the past, present, and future of the city. In particular, students should promote the understanding of the city's urban and architectural history, particularly its restructuring as an European metropolis in the 21st century. They must develop complementary design strategies combining the understanding and delimitation of site; the approach to urban, landscape, and architectural elements (both historic and new); and the consideration of public access and circulation, spatial sequencing, and material and environmental conditions.

The City Museum should serve as a point of encounter for citizens and visitors alike. It should provide a forum for the debate between the simultaneous efforts of historic, territorial, and environmental preservation and the promotion of innovative studies and projects deal with contemporary, everyday spatial and social processes and urban and architectural challenges.

The historic Uffizi building and existing rowing club on the riverbank should not be affected by the City Museum proposal. However, while the plaza and belvedere must remain visually open, the area along the riverbank may be occupied with new elements connected to the museum, extending the existing belvedere and offering a second access point from the street.