Advanced Studio, Spring 2012: Ruy/Stitelman

  • Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Kyle Fant for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Natasha Dunn for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Natasha Dunn for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Natasha Dunn for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Natasha Dunn for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Cai Chengzhi for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Cai Chengzhi for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Jina Kim for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Jina Kim for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Jina Kim for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.
    Work by Jina Kim for advanced studio taught by David Ruy & Jonathan Stitelman, Spring 2012.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2012
Park/Park

David Ruy, Visiting Professor
Jonathan Stitelman, Lecturer

This comprehensive studio investigates a recent interest in rethinking parking structures as a new kind of civic space for the 21st century. Parking structures were originally understood either as purely utilitarian shelters devoid of architectural content or as fenced off, non-spaces. However, as architects, planners, and developers began to realize in the mid-20th century that cars were starting to dominate urbanization, some interesting examples started to emerge, speculating on more productive ways to think about parking. This has culminated recently in Herzog & de Meuron's well-publicized project 1111 Lincoln Road, Miami, the success of which has encouraged many cities to start rethinking the architectural possibilities of parking structures. Such innovative examples of parking structures from the past century provide inspiration as students develop projects that privilege the parking structure as a significant architectural object.

Because parking structures are, in essence, uninterrupted extensions of the ground coiled into a building, students can think of the parking structure as occupying a vague condition in between surface and volume. The elimination of enclosure (slabs without exterior cladding) makes the relationship between inside and outside indeterminate. In this regard, students extend this geometric and spatial ambiguity into a consideration of what might be in between landscape and building, public and private.

The project site is the southern edge of St. Louis' Forest Park. The proposed parking structure must interface between the fast movement of the highway and the slow movement of the landscape, integrating leisure programs and park services. Though parking is usually thought of as the minor adjunct of enclosed program (enclosed program with some parking), students are asked to think of this project as the reverse (parking with some enclosed program).