MUD Studio, Spring 2012: Hoal & Schulze

  • Work by Ke Shi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Ke Shi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Ke Shi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Ke Shi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Linda Levin for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Linda Levin for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Mohammed Almahood for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Mohammed Almahood for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Mohammed Almahood for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Mohammed Almahood for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
  • Work by Yue Bi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.
    Work by Yue Bi for MUD studio taught by John Hoal & Oliver Schulze, Spring 2012.

MUD Studio, Spring 2012
The Lively Studio: Imagine the Los Angeles You Want; Observe the Los Angeles You Get

John Hoal, Associate Professor
Oliver Schulze, Visiting Professor

The magic of the city is choice, especially opportunities for "being in public"—that is, enjoying a variety of social and cultural activities, accomplishing the necessities of everyday life, and generally "being alive in the city."

Providing people with access to stimulating and lively urban environments is an important prerequisite for a high quality of life in cities. A lively city is one in which the urban economy will continue to flourish and where environmentally sustainable structures will still be culturally relevant to future generations.

This MUD studio explores established and new ways of observing urban life as a starting point from which to shape design proposals for urban environments. Studying urban quality requires documenting and analyzing a complex array of data. Successful evidence-based design relies on rigorous methodology to enable the preparation and careful execution of surveys. The quality and nature of the information collated sets the context for how the data is used to understand, compare, and benchmark aspects of urban quality, and how it informs the design of proposed physical changes and consequential transformations in use by people.

During the semester, students survey the public life in the Los Angeles Special Entertainment District (LASED) and the surrounding South Park District. Students practice essential skills to align the transformation of physical urban infrastructure with our changing expectations toward urban life today. Outcomes include observing existing urban life and mapping urban quality; planning for additional public life and high quality of life; developing area strategies based on urban quality; and connecting urban life and urban form through design.