Advanced Studio, Fall 2011: Cloepfil

  • Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
  • Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Aubree Robichaud for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
  • Work by Allison Mendez for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Allison Mendez for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
  • Work by Daphne Robinson for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Daphne Robinson for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
  • Work by Daphne Robinson for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Daphne Robinson for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
  • Work by Isvara Hedding for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.
    Work by Isvara Hedding for advanced studio taught by Brad Cloepfil, Fall 2011.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2011
AMPLIFIER | FOUR ACTS OF IMMANENT ARCHITECTURE

Brad Cloepfil, Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

This studio examines four distinct sites in the United States and the cultural, environmental, and experiential landscapes manifested in them, with the intent of developing resultant and responsive acts of propositional architecture. Students are charged with the task of identifying local conditions and concentrating those forces acting upon a site to create a new built form of ritual and communal architecture—a form that supports both individual and collective use for the purpose of celebration, contemplation, and ceremony.

This architecture manifests an absolutely specific response to context with a distinct new purpose/function. Through acts of immanent domain, students select sites, explore their potential, and propose new architecture that amplifies understanding, experience, and purpose.

The studio begins with a three- to four-week investigative charrette that explores the physical and cultural context of the four given sites. These sites may include "unbuilt/sacred" sites in the pristine landscapes of National Wildlife Preserves, "devastated/toxic sites" found in inner-city neighborhoods of cities such as Memphis and Detroit, "completed/stable" urban sites such as Michigan Avenue in Chicago or NoMad/Broadway in New York City, or "unstable/dangerous" sites such as those along the Mississippi River and Gulf Coast—sites pounded by continual natural disasters. Students look deeply into the potential of these disparate environments, using the tools and precedent of landscape design, infrastructure design, and site-specific art combined with environmental and architectural precedent.