Advanced Studio, Fall 2011: MacDonald

  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011.
  • Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011. Photo by Stan Strembicki.
    Work for advanced studio taught by Joe MacDonald, Fall 2011. Photo by Stan Strembicki.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2011
Reticulated Form: Full-Scale Prototyping_Digital Fabrications

Joe MacDonald, Visiting Professor

This research and design studio focuses on parametric explorations of reticulation: division, marking, and assembly with the intention of forming programmatic and structural networks. Students are asked to seek creative architectural solutions based on material properties, formal geometry, and the spatial implications of a full-scale installation.

Reticulated surfaces—like the patterned skin of a giraffe or a python—have non-repeating patterns comprised of lines and surfaces, which generate networks that arise spontaneously but inevitably from the programming of genetics. Using this process of form-making as inspiration, the studio's work with reticulation aims to systematically engage building, landscape, and program as self-generating and multi-dimensionally connective systems. Topics of study include: Con-Figurative Processes (Bottom-Up vs. Top-Down); Part to Whole Relationships; Base Unit and Aggregation: Global and Local Modulation; Relational Architecture; and Armature, Surface, and Interface.

The site for the studio is discovered over the course of the semester by integrating conceptual understanding of both the potential implications of the fabricated form and of Givens Hall and environs as the host site. That relationship should be understood as a reciprocal one. Students are asked to develop individual programs associated with fabrication, based in part on their understanding of a very specific local context. They then work in teams during the fabrication component of the studio.

This studio is Rhino-based. The first weeks of the semester are dedicated to intensive tutorials in Rhino and its parametric plug-in Grasshopper, led by instructor Arash Adel.