Faculty portfolios

  • Support Structures, 2012, performance with Rex Vogler. Photo credit: Erin Elder.
    Support Structures, 2012, performance with Rex Vogler. Photo credit: Erin Elder.
  • Closing Corner II, 2012, site-specific installation and performance, Tres Piedras, NM.
    Closing Corner II, 2012, site-specific installation and performance, Tres Piedras, NM.
  • Centers, 2011, traveling exhibition to the geographic centers of the United States with The Center for Land Use Interpretation.
    Centers, 2011, traveling exhibition to the geographic centers of the United States with The Center for Land Use Interpretation.
  • Internal improvement I-IV, 2012, installation view.
    Internal improvement I-IV, 2012, installation view.
  • An Agreement on Exclusions, 2012, zinc, silica franking sand, steel. Photo credit: Winston Riley.
    An Agreement on Exclusions, 2012, zinc, silica franking sand, steel. Photo credit: Winston Riley.
  • The Blinding Light of Concern, 2012, polyurethane resin. Photo credit: Winston Riley.
    The Blinding Light of Concern, 2012, polyurethane resin. Photo credit: Winston Riley.

Jesse Vogler

Assistant Professor

Campus Box 1079
Biography 

Jesse Vogler is an artist and designer whose work sits at the intersection of landscape, politics, and performance. His writing and projects address the entanglements between landscape and law, and take on themes of work, property, expertise, and perfectibility. Vogler is a MacDowell Fellow and, in addition to his art and design practice (www.jessevogler.com), he is a land surveyor, co-directs the Institute of Marking and Measuring, and teaches across landscape, architecture, art, and urbanism.

Recent projects include a series of mobile exhibits on the administrative landscape with The Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI); a reclamation plan for the Kavtiskhevi Quarry in Georgia (with Ruderal Academy), which won a Quarry Life Award; and a site-specific boundary installation at P.L.A.N.D. artist residency. Vogler's work has been supported by Graham Foundation grants as well as the Mellon Foundation's Divided City initiative, and has been exhibited at the CLUI, the Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe, The Luminary, the Terrain Biennial, and the Museum of Capitalism. Recent publications featuring his writings and work include Perspecta, Forty-Five, Ground Up, Art in America, Domus, and Landscape Architecture Magazine. In addition, his writing on the architecture and geography of the U.S. Postal System was awarded the inaugural national award for postal scholarship by the USPS, and has been published in MONU, [bracket], and Thresholds.

Teaching & Research Statement

Teaching is central to my practice, and all my graduate-level classes are spaces of pedagogical experimentation and attention building—a space for turning thought against itself and articulating doubt. The One Tree Project is emblematic of this approach. In this project, we looked to take on the cultural meanings, biological functioning, and ecological communities of the arboreal landscape through the intensive study of a single tree. From microbial subsoil relationships to treetop habitat, throughout the class we used the space of the tree as a living landscape laboratory—asking questions of the tree, and asking questions of ourselves.

Interdisciplinary collaboration is not just an occasional way of working but an entire orientation in my practice. Recent collaborative, landscape-based research projects include: an experimental digital humanities publication investigating the cultural landscapes of the American Bottom floodplain to the east of St. Louis (www.theamericanbottom.org), co-directed with Matthew Fluharty; an exhibit on the hydraulic cultures and infrastructures of the middle Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico (www.acequias.org), curated with Chesney Floyd; and a current project of photographs, experimental writing, and counter-mappings with Jennifer Colten titled Significant and Insignificant Mounds, which looks to read across the pre-contact Native American mounds and the 19th century industrial piles of the St. Louis region.

I am particularly interested in the production of platforms for critical, creative exchange. In 2017 I co-convened an experimental, peripatetic conference, Critical Spatial Practices St. Louis, which brought together artists, architects, landscape architects, and community activists around a multi-institutional set of conversations. This approach builds on my Spatial Practices field schools—month-long road-trip seminars on the political geography of the Americas and the social and spatial aspirations that have shaped it. In addition, I am currently programming the American Bottom Field Station—a mobile exhibition space developed in collaboration with the Center for Land Use Interpretation—as a site for exhibits about a specific landscape to be shown in that landscape.

In 2016, I was a Fulbright Scholar in Tbilisi, Georgia, where, through a research project titled Displaced Landscapes, I researched transitional systems of property, geography, and memory in the built environment. I continue collaborations with my Georgian colleagues through the informal MFA program at the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, where I lead workshops on contextual practice, as well as through the Visual Art and Design School at the Free University of Tbilisi. Elements of this work and writing is forthcoming in the volume Tbilisi: An Archive of Transition, a collaborative editorial project published by Niggli.