Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Award

2019-Stone-&-DeGuire-SFS-web.gifWork by 2018 award recipients Elana Mann and Erik L. Peterson.

About the Award

The Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Award was created by Nancy Stone DeGuire (1947-2013) and Lawrence R. DeGuire Jr. (1947-2006) via a bequest to the School; it was their desire to help fellow alumni artists advance their studio practice. Stone & DeGuire met as undergraduate art students at Washington University, were married, and worked closely together in a studio practice.

Awards are given every one to two years. A maximum of two awards will be given for each round, each award totaling $25,000. Funds will be used by the recipient within a year of receipt of the award to advance his or her art practice. Funds may be used for supplies and equipment, travel, studio rent, production of work, exhibition expenses, documentation of work, and other expenses directly related to the recipient's practice.

2019 Award

Elana Mann (BFA03) and Erik L. Peterson (BFA04) are the recipients of the 2019 Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Awards.
Read the full news release>>

2018 Award

Multimedia artist Ebony G. Patterson (MFA06) and sculptor Jill Downen (MFA01) have been selected as the recipients of the 2018 Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Awards.
Read the full news release>>

2017 Award

Ericka Beckman (BFA74) and Ian Weaver (MFA08) are the recipients of the inaugural Stone & DeGuire Contemporary Art Award.
Read the full news release>>

Questions?

Contact Heather Corcoran at hcorcoran@wustl.edu.

Image Credits: (1) Composers/musicians Micaela Tobin (right) and Sharon Chohi Kim (center) perform with Elana Mann’s hands-up-don’t-shoot-horns September 29, 2018, at the Pitzer College Art Galleries, Claremont, California, in conjunction with Mann’s solo exhibition Instruments of Accountability. Courtesy Elana Mann. (2) Erik L. Peterson, Seep (2016). Installed in the old Texaco building in downtown Norfolk, Virginia, this neon piece “oozes down the wall just as floodwaters often rise up, threatening the city.” Courtesy Erik L. Peterson.